Published Papers

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APPLYING CANINE DETECTION IN SUPPORT OF COLLABORATIVE ARCHAEOLOGY 

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 09 July 2021

JOHN GREBENKEMPER & ADELA MORRIS

INSTITUTE FOR CANINE FORENSICS

BRIAN F. BYRD & LAUREL ENGBRING

FAR WESTERN ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH GROUP, INC.   

Abstract

This article explores the use of specially trained canines to detect the location of human burials in nonmodern archaeological contexts. It discusses the history of the discipline, training and field methods, the importance of developing a working relationship with descendant communities, project examples, an assessment of canine detection effectiveness, and ways to select a canine detection team. The article highlights how the application of canine detection training and protocols to the archaeological record makes it possible to locate potential precontact Native American burial areas without ground disturbance. In some cases, probable burial areas located by canines can be confidentially mapped to ensure avoidance during upcoming construction projects. For a variety of reasons, many Native American communities have been wary of embracing this new method to locate ancestral burials. Today, however, canine detection is widely accepted by many tribal groups in California to locate ancestral burials that might be impacted by construction. Although additional controlled studies and rigorous field laboratory experiments are needed to understand the range of variation in efficacy fully, available results in both North America and Europe demonstrate that specially trained canines can often accurately locate human burials that are more than a thousand years old to within a few meters.

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ASSESSING CANINE FORENSIC RESULTS WITH ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS

AT PROTOHISTORIC SITE SÍI TÚUPENTAK (CA-ALA-565/H)

IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

SAC Proceedings, Volume 33 (2019) 

LAUREL ENGBRING AND BRIAN F. BYRD

FAR WESTERN ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH GROUP, INC.   

JOHN GREBENKEMPER AND ADELA MORRIS

INSTITUTE FOR CANINE FORENSICS

MONICA V. ARELLANO

VICE CHAIRWOMAN, MUWEKMA OHLONE TRIBE

ALAN LEVENTHAL

MUWEKMA OHLONE TRIBAL ARCHAEOLOGIST

Data recovery at Late Period site Síi Túupentak (CA-ALA-565/H) provided a unique opportunity to integrate on-destructive methodology into the identification of human remains. In April 2017, the Institute for Canine Forensics conducted an examination of a 21-by-14-meter portion of the site. Three dogs trained to detect the scent of human remains...

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SHIPWRECKS AND LIME KILNS:

The Hidden History of 19th Century Sailors and Quarrymen of the Central Coast

Mark Hykema

Santa Cruz District Archaeologist

California State Parks

Publications in Cultural Heritage

Number 35, 2018

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By John Grebenkemper

Overland Journal of the Oregon-California Trails Association  

Volume 36, Number 2, Summer 2018

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Using Technology for Cemetery Preservation

 

This resource webpage and training video are the result of a Cemetery Preservation Technology Workshop hosted by the Montana History Foundation in June 2018. ICF was a contributor to this resource.

Canine Forensics is a relatively new method of using trained dogs to identify and map areas of human burial. 

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ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE KUMEYAAY:

Contributions to the Prehistory of Cuyamaca Rancho State Park 

San Diego County, California

Part II: The Dripping Springs Site, CA-SDI-860

​       PUBLICATIONS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE NUMBER 34, 2017

Lynn H. Gamble Department of Anthropology,

University of California, Santa Barbara

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By John Grebenkemper, Kristen Johnson

Overland Journal of the Oregon-California Trails Association  

Volume 33, Number 2, Summer 2015

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By John Grebenkemper, Kristen Johnson, and Adela Morris

Overland Journal of the Oregon-California Trails Association  

Volume 30, Number 3, Fall 2012

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Guidance on the Use  of Historic Human Remains Detection Dogs for Locating Unmarked Cemeteries

By Carey L. Baxter and Michael L. Hargrave

December 2015